Genetically engineered (GE) or genetically modified foods may not be as risky as you think!

Genetically engineered (GE) or genetically modified foods may not be as risky as you think!

Genetically engineered (GE) or genetically modified organism (GMO) foods are present throughout modern foods around the world. GMO foods come from genetically modified seeds that have certain desirable traits to help farmers attain better crops with fewer resources. These seeds are only available to farmers after years of testing for public and environmental safety. To date, 10 crops have been approved and are commercially available in the United States: soybeans, corn, canola, cotton, alfalfa, sugar beets, squash, papayas, apples, and potatoes. Salmon is also approved but is not yet available commercially. These crops have been approved in the U.S. to be bred to be herbicide tolerant, insect resistant, drought tolerant, and virus resistant. Genetic engineering also improves fatty acid profiles, reduces antinutrient content, and promotes non-browning.
Recently a systemic review was done to examine the effect of human consumption of GE foods on human health. Results from these studies did not reveal any adverse health effects to allergenicity or nutrient adequacy. In other words, based on the current data and research, allergenicity and nutrient adequacy of genetically engineered foods are no different than that of conventional foods. Also, no diseases or conditions are linked to consumption of GE foods. There are no adverse effects of consuming GE/GMO foods.
While we can continue this debate of GMO vs non-GMO foods, we should not deny the potential good genetic engineering can bring to our food supply. A recent article on Time magazine says, “In 25 years, the items in your grocery basket could be as high-tech as the smartphone in your pocket.” So, do not hesitate to enjoy any time stovetop-roasted corn on the cob without worrying about whether it is genetically modified. This any time corn on the cob can easily fit in your healthy diet and lifestyle.
For more information on GMO or GE foods, visit this press release from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).
Source 1: http://www8.nationalacademies.org/onpinews/newsitem.aspx?RecordID=23395
Source 2: http://time.com/money/5347676/food-technology-future-blockchain-chicken/?utm_source=time.com&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=the-brief&utm_content=2018080310amof the article:
Source 3: AND J Acad Nutr diet. 2018;118(6):1106-1127

This post was authored/published by: Shraddha Chaubey, MS, RDN, CD  and  edited by: Ila Chaubey, student, Junior year at UC Berkeley

 



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